Experts Claim Animal’s Deadly Brain Disease Could Jump to Humans, But Wolves Might Protect Us From It

Scientists are currently studying wolves. Why? Because they believe that these animals are the first responders against a deadly brain disease, which could soon infect humans.A Deadly Brain Disease Could Soon Infect Humans; Scientists Claim That Wolves Could Give Protection(Photo : Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
Two young male wolves, two of five that have recently arrived, look out from their enclosure at The Wild Place Project on March 13, 2014 in Bristol, England. A pack of five all male European grey wolves are the latest residents at the recently opened attraction which is an extension of Bristol Zoo Gardens, just off junction 17 of the M5. Originally from Scotland, the wolves and are now living in the new Wolf Wood exhibit; an area of woodland at The Wild Place Project which has been left as natural as possible to replicate their native woodland habitat in Europe.

According to the Independent, a new study is currently conducted to observe the wolves of Yellowstone National Park. The preliminary results suggested that the large native canines can be the first line of defense against a terrible disease that kills herds of wildlife.

MSN reported that the scientists are studying an animal activity they call “predator cleansing,” which happens when the meat-eater sustains the health of a prey population by killing the animals that are infected by the disease.

Wolves can limit the disease’s spread

If the researchers’ theory is correct, this means that the wolves have an important role to play in limiting the spread of chronic wasting disease.A Deadly Brain Disease Could Soon Infect Humans; Scientists Claim That Wolves Could Give Protection(Photo : Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
A young male wolf, one of five that has recently arrived, explores its new enclosure at The Wild Place Project on March 13, 2014 in Bristol, England. A pack of five all male European grey wolves are the latest residents at the recently opened attraction which is an extension of Bristol Zoo Gardens, just off junction 17 of the M5. Originally from Scotland, the wolves and are now living in the new Wolf Wood exhibit; an area of woodland at The Wild Place Project which has been left as natural as possible to replicate their native woodland habitat in Europe.

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The virus is a dangerous one since it infects deer and similar animals across the country and around the world. They are worried that the disease could also infect humans one day.

Ellen Brandell, a doctoral student in wildlife ecology at Penn State University, said that no management tool has been created to effectively control the spread of the disease.

No vaccine yet for the deadly brain disease

Brandell, the one leading the project in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Service, said that no vaccine has been created yet to prevent the spread of the disease.

Many conservationists and biologists said that more studies are needed to strengthen the theory, reintroducing more wolves in certain parts of the United States could help manage wildlife diseases.

However, the idea could be rejected by other ranchers, hunters, and other people concerned about competition from wolves.

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